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Pope Francis salutes Dorothy Day

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DOROTHY DAY

Pope Francis mentioned Dorothy Day in his speech ( See Full Text of Papal Speech Here)

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“Sen. Bernie Sanders  was the lone Democratic presidential hopeful — and the only Jewish contender — in the House chamber for Pope Francis’s speech. When he left, he was beaming, as the Pope had cited an American Catholic whom Sanders had plenty of praise for.

“The name Dorothy Day has not been used in the United States Congress terribly often,” said Sanders in a short interview.

“She was a valiant fighter for workers, was very strong in her belief for social justice, and I think it was extraordinary that he cited her as one of the most important people in recent American history. This would be one of the very, very few times that somebody as radical as Dorothy Day was mentioned.”

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The Pope Said:

In these times when social concerns are so important, I cannot fail to mention the Servant of God Dorothy Day, who founded the Catholic Worker Movement. Her social activism, her passion for justice and for the cause of the oppressed, were inspired by the Gospel, her faith, and the example of the saints.

How much progress has been made in this area in so many parts of the world! How much has been done in these first years of the third millennium to raise people out of extreme poverty! I know that you share my conviction that much more still needs to be done, and that in times of crisis and economic hardship a spirit of global solidarity must not be lost. At the same time I would encourage you to keep in mind all those people around us who are trapped in a cycle of poverty. They too need to be given hope. The fight against poverty and hunger must be fought constantly and on many fronts, especially in its causes. I know that many Americans today, as in the past, are working to deal with this problem.

 

DOROTHY DAY Quotes: Here

“As for ourselves, yes, we must be meek, bear injustice, malice, rash judgment. We must turn the other cheek, give up our cloak, go a second mile.”

We cannot build up the idea of the apostolate of the laity without the foundation of the liturgy.

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We are the nation the most powerful, the most armed and we are supplying arms and money to the rest of the world where we are not ourselves fighting. We are eating while there is famine in the world.

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Three Wild and Radical Catholic Women

Mother Teresa of Calcutta,  described as one of the most compelling Christian witnesses of the 20th century,  established centers and communities of service around the globe for the sick, the homeless, the dying, and the unwanted.

Mother Teresa founded the Missionaries of Charity, a Roman Catholic religious congregation, which in 2012 consisted of over 4,500 sisters and is active in 133 countries.
Honored by universities and a Nobel Peace Prize, she said, “We can do no great things, only small things with great love.”

And when people begged to travel to join her in her “wonderful work” in Calcutta, she told them sternly, “Find your own Calcutta!”

When Dorothy Day died(1980) at the age of 83, she was described as “the most influential and significant figure in the history of the American Catholic Church.”
Recently  a group of Catholic journalists and theologians nominated her as the most important Catholic lay person of the century.

Ms Day was the co-founder of the Catholic Worker movement.
She represented a new kind of political holiness – a way of serving Christ both through prayer and care for the poor.
Ms Day focused on solidarity with the poor in their struggle for justice.
She combined a  traditional piety and radical social positions around pacificism, civil rights and what she called “the mystery of the poor.” “They are Jesus,” she said, “and what you do to them, you do to Him.”

Finally! In the Sunday New York times Magazine – a true radical

Sister Florence Deacon of the New York Times Magazine acticle

and at the Reflections on Womens Rights

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